Craft&Culture


    Trendy Tradition

      5-10-2015
    Revealing the history behind some of Indonesia’s traditional fabrics and costumes, and how they become part of our modern lives...
    According to some experts, the history of Indonesian textiles begins around the 8th century B.C. with the use of leaves, wood, and simple weaving techniques. By the 3rd century B.C., the highland Chinese wanderers arrived in Indonesia and introduced the very first modern weaved textile. Indonesia has 45 different types of trees across the archipelago that can be used as raw materials for fabrics, and eventually those natural resources put Indonesia on the map of the textile industry as the locals started to create their own fabric. To date, there are thousands of traditional fabrics and costumes across Indonesia, and some of them are now taking on the world, like Batik, Songket, and the Kebaya for example.

    Trendy Tradition



    Batik

    One of the most famous fabrics in Indonesia, Batik is basically made with a wax-resist dyeing technique – a technique that has been practiced by the Egyptians since the 4th century B.C. The Chinese actually also had their own version of fabric using this particular technique, as well as the Japanese, Malaysians, and Africans. But it was the Hindu pilgrims who introduced this fabric along with its many patterns – all were made in India – to the Indonesians.
    The Indonesians then developed a similar type of dyeing process with a unique pattern that is now known as Batik. However, archeologist F.A. Sutjipto believes that this dyeing technique for Batik is originally from Indonesia, as some parts of the archipelago like Toraja, Flores, and Papua also have their own version of Batik, with no proof of any influence from the Hindu pilgrims.

    Trendy Tradition



    Kebaya

    This traditional Indonesian female top is made of silk, thin cotton, and nylon with floral embroidery. The Kebaya is usually paired with a sarong for formal occasions like traditional ceremonies in Java, Bali, and Sumatra.
    The Kebaya was originally inspired by the Arab and Chinese travelers who came to Indonesia in the 15th century. Prior to 1600, the Kebaya was only for the royal and noble families while others remained topless. With the influence of the Muslim pilgrims that women should cover themselves, it didn’t take long for the Kebaya to become one of the characteristics of Indonesian ladies.

    Trendy Tradition



    Songket

    This hand-woven fabric made of silk or cotton with gold or silver-thread patterns is believed to have been introduced to Indonesia by Indian and Arab merchants. The Sriwijaya kingdom, with its capital city located in Palembang, Sumatra, is thought to be one of the first royals to use Songket in their daily lives. Not only in Sumatra, Songket is also found in Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Lombok, Sumbawa, and Bali.
    There are two stages in producing Songket; first is to create the fabric base, then to make the pattern using threads. In Bali, the Songket designs have been modified to meet the market trend – you can find Songket with patterns using gold, silver, or other colorful threads. Klungkung is the center of Songket production in the island, but that doesn’t mean you have to go all the way to Klungkung to find it, because Songket is available in most art markets in Bali.
    Batik
    Trendy Tradition

    One of the most famous fabrics in Indonesia, Batik is basically made with a wax-resist dyeing technique – a technique that has been practiced by the Egyptians since the 4th century B.C. The Chinese actually also had their own version of fabric using this particular technique, as well as the Japanese, Malaysians, and Africans. But it was the Hindu pilgrims who introduced this fabric along with its many patterns – all were made in India – to the Indonesians.
    The Indonesians then developed a similar type of dyeing process with a unique pattern that is now known as Batik. However, archeologist F.A. Sutjipto believes that this dyeing technique for Batik is originally from Indonesia, as some parts of the archipelago like Toraja, Flores, and Papua also have their own version of Batik, with no proof of any influence from the Hindu pilgrims.
    Kebaya
    Trendy Tradition

    This traditional Indonesian female top is made of silk, thin cotton, and nylon with floral embroidery. The Kebaya is usually paired with a sarong for formal occasions like traditional ceremonies in Java, Bali, and Sumatra.
    The Kebaya was originally inspired by the Arab and Chinese travelers who came to Indonesia in the 15th century. Prior to 1600, the Kebaya was only for the royal and noble families while others remained topless. With the influence of the Muslim pilgrims that women should cover themselves, it didn’t take long for the Kebaya to become one of the characteristics of Indonesian ladies.
    Songket
    Trendy Tradition

    This hand-woven fabric made of silk or cotton with gold or silver-thread patterns is believed to have been introduced to Indonesia by Indian and Arab merchants. The Sriwijaya kingdom, with its capital city located in Palembang, Sumatra, is thought to be one of the first royals to use Songket in their daily lives. Not only in Sumatra, Songket is also found in Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Lombok, Sumbawa, and Bali.
    There are two stages in producing Songket; first is to create the fabric base, then to make the pattern using threads. In Bali, the Songket designs have been modified to meet the market trend – you can find Songket with patterns using gold, silver, or other colorful threads. Klungkung is the center of Songket production in the island, but that doesn’t mean you have to go all the way to Klungkung to find it, because Songket is available in most art markets in Bali.

     
    Bayu Rahanatha

       Contributor : Bayu Rahanatha


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