Lifestyle&Leisure


    Bali’s One And Only

      30-9-2017
    Bali’s original produce and where to find them...

    Bali has so much more than meets the eye. The island is not only about traditions, sunsets, and parties but is also home to some of the rarest produce in Indonesia, if not the world. For all the true foodies out there, get ready as we present a special bucket list for you to check out when you are on the island.

    Bali’s One And Only



    Créme De La Cré

    Considered the champagne of coffee, kopi luwak or the civet coffee is one of the most coveted drinks in the world with a price of more than US$ 250/100 grams. The coffee is sourced from a civet, a small mammal that wanders around a coffee plantation and selects only the finest coffee cherries to eat for snacks. However, it can’t digest the coffee stones and will soon excrete them out – this is when its anal glands impart an elusive musky smoothness to the “roasted” coffee.

    Today, many varieties of civet coffee are cultivated on civet coffee farms. This practice, however, is highly criticized as the civets are caged and only fed with coffee beans, which is not their proper diet. But there are some coffee roasters who only use 100 percent wild civet coffee, sourced directly from some coffee farmers in Bali. And it is not difficult to differentiate the kopi luwak from wild and caged civets – their feces show what the animals have been eating in addition to coffee cherries. The limited amount of farmers who can submit wild coffee civets each month also helps maintain authenticity.

    To enjoy the most expensive coffee in the world at its best, sourced from wild civets, you can go to Dulang at The St. Regis Bali Resort. After indulging in some Indonesian dishes through the restaurant’s signature rijsttafel dinner or rice table, a cup of civet coffee is surely a wonderful closure to your dining experience.

    Dulang
    The St. Regis Bali Resort
    ITDC Lot S6, Nusa Dua
    (0361) 847-8111

    Bali’s One And Only



    Local Spirits

    The island’s signature liquor, arak Bali, is distilled from rice or palm sap with alcohol content ranging from 20 to 50 percent. It is often used in offerings to ward off evil spirits and is one of the less regulated alcoholic beverages – that is why you need to be careful when you want to sample this drink.

    The cheapest arak drink costs around US$2, however it is generally not recommended to consume that or any other cocktails at a bar serving drinks advertised below US$5, as often they can cause methanol poisoning. It can be tricky to find a decent place that serves arak without putting your life on the line, so we did the research for you and found Akademi Bar.

    As a dedicated center of libations, Akademi Bar is not only one of the few places that serves proper arak Bali but at the same time educates their guests about this particularly notorious spirit, spreading awareness that it can be a safe drink and even made into a world-class cocktail. Made in Bali with the highest standard, the arak Bali at Akademi Bar is also infused with more than 20 types of ingredients. From the most common ingredients such as cinnamon and citrus to the more exotic spices like asam kranji or Borneo tamarind, a fruit that only grows once every 10 years. Ask for the arak tasting or cocktail sampling made with one of the arak infusions at Akademi Bar, and you will have a better understanding of this spirit.

    Akademi Bar
    Katamama Hotel
    Jalan Petitenget No. 51B, Seminyak
    (0361) 302-9940

    Bali’s One And Only



    Black is the New Pig

    With the advancement in today’s food and beverage industry, heritage food breeds are often outpaced and easily forgotten, mostly due to cost and cultivating time among other reasons. The same happens here in Bali with the island’s Heritage Pig.

    Decades ago, before the flood of commercially-bred, turbo-charged Landrace pigs, there were bangkal hitam (black pigs) in almost all households in Bali. They were fed with windfall mangoes and kitchen waste, and made ready for the next ceremonial feast. Bangkal hitam is basically a free-range pig which is different from its “cousin” – the regular pig species that we usually consume, in both in taste and texture.

    With thick black skin, bangkal hitam – which is smaller in size than its “cousin” – takes a year and a half to grow, and this makes their meat more flavorful in addition to the fact that they are almost always on the move. That’s why, their meat costs double compared to the Landrace pigs which only need six to eight months to grow.

    Black pig is in very limited supply at the moment. The Restaurant at The Legian Bali – which focuses heavily on local organic produce – is the one and only restaurant on the island that serves bangkal hitam in some of their amazing dishes. It was The Restaurant’s Chef Luke MacLeod who brought this meat to the table after his wife found it at Samadi Market in Canggu. While the menu at The Restaurant is constantly changing, bangkal hitam remains one of the favorite among its guests. Don’t forget to make a reservation if you want to dine here and taste its delicious bangkal hitam creation.

    The Restaurant at The Legian Bali
    Jalan Kayu Aya, Seminyak
    (0361) 730-622

    Bali’s One And Only



    Prizes Rice

    Rice has been the staple food of Indonesia for generations. However, not many people know that most of the rice used today is the new hybrid that is genetically engineered, which makes it unqualified as organic produce. But the rice from Jatiluwih, a region in western Bali that is famous as one of the UNESCO World Heritages, is an exception.

    The old traditional organic Balinese rice has been cultivated for years, and has become a heritage that is almost lost in this modern world. Balinese rice takes 210 days to grow, which is the same length as a year in a Balinese calendars. This means it can only be harvested two times in a year at maximum, while the new rice species can be harvested three times per year. The new rice hybrid can also produce more tons of rice per hectare than the Balinese rice.

    Yet, Balinese rice contains more nutrients than the new rice. So, it is only natural that Hujan Locale, a restaurant helmed by Chef Will Meyrick of Sarong Group that presents Indonesian dishes and focuses on the country’s best local produce, uses Balinese rice as one of its staple starches. You can pair the Balinese rice with one – or more – of their authentic local dishes for a real taste of Indonesia.

    Hujan Locale
    Jalan Sri Wedari No. 5, Ubud
    0813-3972-0306
    Créme De La Cré
    Bali’s One And Only

    Considered the champagne of coffee, kopi luwak or the civet coffee is one of the most coveted drinks in the world with a price of more than US$ 250/100 grams. The coffee is sourced from a civet, a small mammal that wanders around a coffee plantation and selects only the finest coffee cherries to eat for snacks. However, it can’t digest the coffee stones and will soon excrete them out – this is when its anal glands impart an elusive musky smoothness to the “roasted” coffee.

    Today, many varieties of civet coffee are cultivated on civet coffee farms. This practice, however, is highly criticized as the civets are caged and only fed with coffee beans, which is not their proper diet. But there are some coffee roasters who only use 100 percent wild civet coffee, sourced directly from some coffee farmers in Bali. And it is not difficult to differentiate the kopi luwak from wild and caged civets – their feces show what the animals have been eating in addition to coffee cherries. The limited amount of farmers who can submit wild coffee civets each month also helps maintain authenticity.

    To enjoy the most expensive coffee in the world at its best, sourced from wild civets, you can go to Dulang at The St. Regis Bali Resort. After indulging in some Indonesian dishes through the restaurant’s signature rijsttafel dinner or rice table, a cup of civet coffee is surely a wonderful closure to your dining experience.

    Dulang
    The St. Regis Bali Resort
    ITDC Lot S6, Nusa Dua
    (0361) 847-8111
    Local Spirits
    Bali’s One And Only

    The island’s signature liquor, arak Bali, is distilled from rice or palm sap with alcohol content ranging from 20 to 50 percent. It is often used in offerings to ward off evil spirits and is one of the less regulated alcoholic beverages – that is why you need to be careful when you want to sample this drink.

    The cheapest arak drink costs around US$2, however it is generally not recommended to consume that or any other cocktails at a bar serving drinks advertised below US$5, as often they can cause methanol poisoning. It can be tricky to find a decent place that serves arak without putting your life on the line, so we did the research for you and found Akademi Bar.

    As a dedicated center of libations, Akademi Bar is not only one of the few places that serves proper arak Bali but at the same time educates their guests about this particularly notorious spirit, spreading awareness that it can be a safe drink and even made into a world-class cocktail. Made in Bali with the highest standard, the arak Bali at Akademi Bar is also infused with more than 20 types of ingredients. From the most common ingredients such as cinnamon and citrus to the more exotic spices like asam kranji or Borneo tamarind, a fruit that only grows once every 10 years. Ask for the arak tasting or cocktail sampling made with one of the arak infusions at Akademi Bar, and you will have a better understanding of this spirit.

    Akademi Bar
    Katamama Hotel
    Jalan Petitenget No. 51B, Seminyak
    (0361) 302-9940
    Black is the New Pig
    Bali’s One And Only

    With the advancement in today’s food and beverage industry, heritage food breeds are often outpaced and easily forgotten, mostly due to cost and cultivating time among other reasons. The same happens here in Bali with the island’s Heritage Pig.

    Decades ago, before the flood of commercially-bred, turbo-charged Landrace pigs, there were bangkal hitam (black pigs) in almost all households in Bali. They were fed with windfall mangoes and kitchen waste, and made ready for the next ceremonial feast. Bangkal hitam is basically a free-range pig which is different from its “cousin” – the regular pig species that we usually consume, in both in taste and texture.

    With thick black skin, bangkal hitam – which is smaller in size than its “cousin” – takes a year and a half to grow, and this makes their meat more flavorful in addition to the fact that they are almost always on the move. That’s why, their meat costs double compared to the Landrace pigs which only need six to eight months to grow.

    Black pig is in very limited supply at the moment. The Restaurant at The Legian Bali – which focuses heavily on local organic produce – is the one and only restaurant on the island that serves bangkal hitam in some of their amazing dishes. It was The Restaurant’s Chef Luke MacLeod who brought this meat to the table after his wife found it at Samadi Market in Canggu. While the menu at The Restaurant is constantly changing, bangkal hitam remains one of the favorite among its guests. Don’t forget to make a reservation if you want to dine here and taste its delicious bangkal hitam creation.

    The Restaurant at The Legian Bali
    Jalan Kayu Aya, Seminyak
    (0361) 730-622
    Prizes Rice
    Bali’s One And Only

    Rice has been the staple food of Indonesia for generations. However, not many people know that most of the rice used today is the new hybrid that is genetically engineered, which makes it unqualified as organic produce. But the rice from Jatiluwih, a region in western Bali that is famous as one of the UNESCO World Heritages, is an exception.

    The old traditional organic Balinese rice has been cultivated for years, and has become a heritage that is almost lost in this modern world. Balinese rice takes 210 days to grow, which is the same length as a year in a Balinese calendars. This means it can only be harvested two times in a year at maximum, while the new rice species can be harvested three times per year. The new rice hybrid can also produce more tons of rice per hectare than the Balinese rice.

    Yet, Balinese rice contains more nutrients than the new rice. So, it is only natural that Hujan Locale, a restaurant helmed by Chef Will Meyrick of Sarong Group that presents Indonesian dishes and focuses on the country’s best local produce, uses Balinese rice as one of its staple starches. You can pair the Balinese rice with one – or more – of their authentic local dishes for a real taste of Indonesia.

    Hujan Locale
    Jalan Sri Wedari No. 5, Ubud
    0813-3972-0306

     
    Joseph Wang

       Contributor : Joseph Wang


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